Get Fulfilled And Change the World: My Interview w/ Richard May Founder of B>U

On June 13th Jamie Slaughter woke up early and drove to Lake Austin on the Colorado river.  He put on his goggles and swim cap and dove into the water.

James wouldn’t get out until he had reached the other side of the lake. Which wouldn’t be exceptional except that the other side was 21 miles away.

Why did James set out to swim the length of the English Channel? To let the world know about drowning death of 4-yr Colin Hoist.

This is one of the stories you can read on the website B>U. Matt Evans and his partner Richard May formed B>U to share inspiring stories and encourage everyone to live a fulfilled life.

In this interview I talk with Richard about how living your dreams inspires others and why fulfillment is a path not a destination. I hope you enjoy.

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Interview Questions

 

1. Some of the stories on your site feature atheletes others community service, how do these elements play into being a better person?

2. What role does awareness play into the work you do?

3. How can people change their lives for the better in a lasting way?

Richard May and Matt Evans mindfitmove mindfulfitness inspiration b>U stories

Richard “Bee” May Bio

In 2001, I produced and directed my first feature length movie – “A Documentary”. The movie was based on the most powerful question of your world: Are you fulfilled?

What was more interesting about creating the movie was I had never held a camera in my life. But, every day for two years, I learned a little more until the movie won “Best Documentary” at the barebones film festival.

It was then I realized I was already living the B>U philosophy. So when Matt started explaining the concept, I had to stop him mid-sentence and tell him “I’m in. Let’s do it.”

So every day, I live my own B>U. Helping grieving parents from losing a child to being a better parent. Writing a new song or smiling more than yesterday.

But, one thing I do try is to promote B>U a little more each day. Because if I can inspire just one person to be greater than themselves then we are one step closer to a better humanity.

I want to thank Richard for talking to me. Be Sure to check out his website begreaterthanU.com and his facebook page

 

 

All Exercise Is Meaningless

Cat + Weights

“C’est La Vie”
Photo by kcxd

Every bit of exercise you do is meaningless.

Don’t Just ‘DO IT’
For years, I did things without knowing why. I may have had reasons, but they were hidden from me. Living at a Zen monastery changed that.

Before every activity at the monastery we said a dedication. We’d recite a chant and then dedicate the merit to someone or something.

After a while, I stopped thinking about why we did it.

When I left the monastery, I noticed that many activities lacked weight. This was especially true for exercise. I wanted my efforts to be more than just an ego game.

Check, ‘Me’ Out
Fitness can become all about me, me, me. I want to have a six-pack so girls will look at me. I want to ride faster than everyone else, so I feel like a king.

This focus on the self makes parts the fitness industry hollow, shallow, and inauthentic.

I wanted it to be different. That’s when I remembered the dedications at Great Vow. So, I wrote a dedication for exercise.

All of a sudden, my exercise became an act of service.

I was exercising:

  • To have more strength to help others.
  • To help clarify my mind.
  • To live longer and serve more.
  • To support my family and friends.

This simple dedication changed the meaning behind my workouts. Best of all it can do the same for you.

A 4 step guide to writing a dedication for any purpose.

1. Write down a truth: What is it that you need to remember? Something you know is true in your heart, but often forget.

Some examples are:  Anything is possible, Exercise isn’t selfish, I may not do it today, but that doesn’t mean I won’t do it someday.

2. Write down an intention: An intention is similar to, but not the same as a goal. It has more to do with internal energy rather than external measurement. It’s something only you can judge.

Some Examples are: I will feel more confident, I will move with more ease, I will change my life.

3. Write down who or what it’s for:We never exist in complete independence. If our course is only devoted to ourselves, the pursuit becomes hollow. When we dedicate our effort to others, it becomes much more.

Choose someone or something to dedicate your effort to. It could be an individual, group, or energy.

Some examples are: I run for my children, I’ll keep going for anyone who’s tried to lose weight and failed, I’ll keep trying in gratitude for the gift of life.

4. Write down what you want to embody:It’s not just about what we do. It’s about how we do it. How we do something is what makes it transformational.

Some examples are: I will embody the persistence of a mighty river, I will embody the strength of Martin Luther King, I will embody the energy of compassion.

Now that you have, your four sentences play around with them. Try putting them in a different order or change the wording.

A client of mine discarded sentences 2-3 and uses her first sentence alone. Do whatever it takes to make it your own.

Finish Line

photo by Candice Villarrea

Keep on Keeping On
All exercise is meaningless, until we realize it’s meaning.

Moreover, seeing our motivation can be very powerful. This process helps find what drives you. Most of all, coming back to your dedication will keep you going when the path gets steep.

I’d love to read your dedications. If you want to share it, please post it below.

Here is the dedication I often use:
My body is subject to old age sickness and death. Nothing I do can change this. I put forth this effort that I may be able to approach everyday with more courage, wisdom, and compassion. I dedicate the merit of this effort to the liberation of all living beings. May my every step embody the path of liberation.